Clay Cutts, L.M.S.W. | Alcoholics Anonymous

Alcoholics Anonymous

 

In Tradition Five, Alcoholics Anonymous admonishes that, “Each group has but one primary purpose-to carry its message to the alcoholic who still suffers.” We don’t have to look very far to see nearly endless problems in the world. On a large scale, political and financial turmoil are ruining countries. Closer to home, any one of us may have a long list of physical or emotional problems. Within an Alcoholics Anonymous …

Read More
 

As a rule, Alcoholics Anonymous does not get involved with other organizations. This is defined by Tradition six which says that, “An A.A. group ought never endorse, finance, or lend the A.A. name to any related facility or outside enterprise, lest problems of money, property, and prestige divert us from our primary purpose.” If You Are Going To Do It…Over-Do It! As an alcoholic, I always subscribed to the “if …

Read More
 

Tradition seven of the Alcoholics Anonymous program says that “Every AA group ought to be fully self-supporting, declining outside contributions.” As a rule, AA politely but firmly declines all donations from outside groups. Instead, they rely on individual members to make small contributions. This tradition is thick with irony. The idea of a bunch of alcoholics managing an organization with NO monetary help from the outside if laughable. Weren’t these the very …

Read More
 

Tradition eight mandates that Alcoholics Anonymous will never have a “professional” class. The tradition says, “Alcoholics Anonymous should remain forever nonprofessional, but our service centers may employ special workers.” By design, Alcoholics Anonymous is made up of amateurs…non-professionals. Meetings are not run by anyone with any special training…not by anyone who makes a job of AA. This tradition follows naturally from the previous tradition, which does not allow for Alcoholics …

Read More
 

Tradition nine of the Alcoholics Anonymous program says that “A.A., as such, ought never be organized; but we may create service boards or committees directly responsible to those they serve.” Lack of organization rails against our every instinct. We see rules and regulation everywhere we go. Our teacher tells us that we must sit in our seat. Our boss tells us that we must show up at a certain time. Even …

Read More
 

“Alcoholics Anonymous has no opinion on outside issues; hence the A.A. name ought never be drawn into public controversy.” This is tradition ten of the Alcoholics Anonymous program. Though plenty of opportunities exist to do so, Alcoholics Anonymous never takes sides in public debates. They even avoid important conversations to which they could lend much insight. They do not back any political candidate. They do not decry organizations that endorse …

Read More
 

Newcomers to Alcoholics Anonymous are usually introduced to the first of the twelve steps on their very first visit to the group. Most Alcoholics Anonymous members with significant sobriety insist on the importance of beginning twelve step work as soon as possible. Alcoholics Anonymous Step 1 – We admitted we were powerless over alcohol—that our lives had become unmanageable. This step has two distinct parts. Unmanageability of My Drinking Life The …

Read More
 

Alcoholics Anonymous prescribes 12 simple steps as the solution to the problem of alcoholism. By working these steps with a qualified sponsor, even the worst “drunk” can return to his place in society. Alcoholics Anonymous is widely considered the original twelve step program. Since the creation of AA in the 1930s, twelve step programs have been created for a huge variety of afflictions. 12 Step Programs Help People with a …

Read More